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Christianity in Crisis

Bryan Fischer of the American Family Association is a professional worrier. He gets paid to imagine the worst-case scenario for the nation's future (from his perspective) and then fret in public over the imminence of that worst-case scenario.

So he must have been privately overjoyed at the Supreme Court's recent decision legalizing same-sex marriage. The decision opens many new avenues of worst-case futures for right-wing Christians; Fischer's toughest decision must have been determining which one to pick. Can you guess what he chose?

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Two Kinds of Marriage

Last Friday's Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage across the United States has produced a lot of outrage from religious conservatives claiming the court has overstepped its boundaries. The decision is a central assault upon marriage, says Albert Mohler, president of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

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What's Five Minus Two, Sally?

Sam Brownback's education cuts have become fodder for Doonesbury. I can't tell you right now how proud I am to call Kansas home.

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Republican Leadership on Climate Change?

In these days, when Republican presidential candidates are proud to deny the reality of anthropogenic climate change, and the Republican chairman of the Environment and Public Works Committee is leading denier in all of Washington, it might be hard to remember the time a leading Republican spoke these words:

The issue of climate change respects no border. Its effects cannot be reined in by an army nor advanced by any ideology. Climate change, with its potential to impact every corner of the world, is an issue that must be addressed by the world.

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Dealing with Drought

California is dry. Really dry. Historically dry. Life-alteringly dry. Dry enough to bring out the political extremists, as if they had crawled up through those cracks in the ground.

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The "Mythical Moderate"

It's a longstanding tradition in American politics that presidential candidates spend most of the primary season trying to appeal to the party's base, liberal or conservative. Then whoever wins the nomination tries to do an about face and present himself or herself as the more moderate and reasonable candidate for the general election. The thinking behind this strategy is that primary voters tend to be extremist, but most voters hew to the center.

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Ideology and Character

In his recent column Why I Don't Like Bill Maher Leonard Pitts succinctly describes what is wrong with American politics today:

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On Inequality

Washington Post columnists George Will and E. J. Dionne both wrote about inequality last week. Not surprisingly, they had very different takes on the subject.

Dionne has taken note of how Congressional Republicans are increasingly turning to rhetoric usually associated with Democrats.

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How Do Tax Rates Affect the Economy?

Supply-side economists like to make a direct link between tax rates and economic growth. Forbes magazine's Ben Wilterdink, in a 2013 article, explains, "Rather than driving up rates on a small number of overburdened taxpayers, these states create an environment where people and businesses can flourish.

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Congressional Situational Ethics

Jon Stewart nails it. When politicians can't determine whether an action is right or wrong until they've determined which political party is doing it, the system is broken.

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